The 13th on the 13th

On Babi Yar there are no monuments

The real monument to those; young and old, Jew and gentile, who died in the horror that was Babi Yar are Yevtushenko’s words and Shostakovich’s searing setting of them in the opening movement of his thirteenth symphony.  It’s a symphony that combines sheer horror with the kind of blistering irony that is unique to Shostakovich.  It’s a work that I first met in my teens and like so much Shostakovich it has run like a leitmotif through my adult life.  So I was deeply moved to hear it given a red blooded, almost balls out Russian style, performance by the TSO last night.  No doubt a Russian conductor; Andrey Boreyko, and a superb Russian bass soloist; Petr Migunov, played a large part in that but so did the players of the TSO and the men of the Amadeus Choir and Elmer Iseler Singers.  The brass was strident and the percussion very loud where it needed to be though there was delicacy too from the rumble of the opening line quoted above to the faint dying away of the last note.  Most excellent.

Petr Migunov, Andrey Boreyko (Malcolm Cook photo).jpg

There was also a very nice performance of Mozart’s Violin Concerto No. 5 but that’s not what I was there for.  This program will be repeated at Roy Thomson Hall tonight at at 7.30pm and tomorrow at 3pm at the George Weston Recital Hall.

Photo credit: Malcolm Cook

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