Intersections

The third concert in the Heliconian Hall series from Adanya Dunn, Brad Cherwin and Alice Hwang was titled Intersections and was designed to explore “the sphinx like mind of Robert Schumann” through his own music and music inspired by him.  First up was Kurtàg’s Hommage à Robert Schumann featuring Alice and Brad and guest violist Laila Zakzook.  This is a complex and difficult piece.  Some sections consist of short fragments of “conversation” between the instruments.  At other times there is a more obvious line and it varies in mood from extremely violent to almost lyrical.  It’s an interesting exploration of Schumann’s various musical personalities through a completely different sound world.

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Century Song

Century Song is a 50 minute show combining music, movement and video projections as it takes us on an aesthetic journey through the last hundred years.  At the heart of the show is soprano Neema Bickersteth who does the singing and dancing.  The singing consists of vocalises by Rachmaninoff, Messiaen, Cage, Aperghis and finally, a piece composed for the show by Reza Jacobs.  The songs are accompanied Gregory Oh on piano and Ben Grossman on percussion and computer.  The musical interludes are structured improvisations originally devised by Reza Jacobs, Gregory Oh and Debashis Sinha.  The dance elements are choreographed by Kate Alton and use a very wide kinetic vocabulary.  Bickersteth’s constantly changing costumes further illustrate the time travel element of the narrative.

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Opera Atelier’s Médée

There are umpteen operas based more or less closely on the legends surrounding Medea, Jason, the Golden Fleece and the events afterwards in Corinth.  Marc-Antoine Charpentier’s 1693 version to a libretto by Corneille deals with the events in Corinth subsequent to Jason and Medea’s return with the fleece.  The plot, in essentials, is simplicity itself.  Jason is scheming to secure his future, and that of his children, by ditching Médée and marrying the king’s daughter Créuse.  Médée is not having this and wreaks revenge on just about everybody else in the piece.  Somehow Charpentier and Corneille string this out over five acts and the obligatory prologue glorifying Louis XIV, wisely omitted by director Marshall Pynkowski.

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Collectìf

Danika Lorèn and co. aka Collectìf were back today with a lunctime show in the RBA.  Like their previous shows this was a themed, more or less staged, series of art songs.  This program was inspired by Verlaine’s Fêtes galantes and featured all French texts set by a range of composers.  Most of it was pretty typical chansons of the fin de siècle; material I find pleasant enough but not especially compelling.  The surprise, and a very welcome one, was four pieces by Reynaldo Hahn setting texts by Charles, duc d’Orléans and Faullin de Banville.  Here Hahn turned his flair for vocal and pianistic colour to great effect producing pieces strangely evocative of the Renaissance.  Fancifully perhaps, I could imagine these being sung at the court of Philip the Good (assuming of course that he had a piano…)

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Philippe Jaroussky and Les Violons du Roy

jarousskyLast night Philippe Jaroussky appeared with Les Violins du Roy and conductor Matthieu Lussier in a mostly Handel program at Koerner Hall.  It was a very good evening.  Les Violons du Roy is a pretty small band; less than twenty including continuo, but they manage to produce quite a big sound while remaining elegant and flexible in a thoroughly idiomatic baroque way.  The instrumental component consisted of a Handel overture, Fux’ Ouverture in D minor and Johann Gottlieb Graun’s (not the better known Carl Graun who was apparently his brother) Symphony in B Flat Major.  It was a pretty good sampling of what one might have heard in the courts of Germany in the early 1700s and rather enjoyable.

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Porgi amor

 

UoT’s show Porgi amor consisted of a series of staged and costumed scenes from Mozart operas with linking commentary, all designed by Michael Patrick Albano.  The operas ranged from La finta giardiniera to La clemenza di Tito with all the major bases in between covered off.  The emphasis was on ensemble numbers and providing opportunities for as many singers as possible so there was a cast of thousands.  It was well structured, quite slick and there was some very decent singing.  One expects a reasonably high standard from UoT Opera and we got it.  As I usually do with this kind of show I’ll refrain from a play-by-play and just talk about a few highlights and do some “talent spotting”.

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Allison and Sinsoulier

The Thursday concert at UoT yesterday was a recital by Joel Allison and Mélisande Sinsoulier, respective winners of the Norcop song prize and Koldofsky prize in accompanying.  It was a very satisfying performance.  Loewe’s Tom der Reimer set the tone with fine singing from Allison and quite inspired pianism from Ms. Sinsoulier.  Allison displayed power and agility plus an ability to sing quite elegantly when required though perhaps he does occasionally “push” the drama a bit further than the text really needs.
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