Looking ahead to June

Suffragette-Banner-4-e1486152573698Usually this is when things start to quieten down. Not so much this year.  On the opera front it does go a bit flat though Opera 5 have their Ethel Smythe double bill opening at Theatre Passe Muraille on the 22nd.  There’s also an evening of opera improv; Whose opera is it anyways?! at the Bad Dog Theatre on the 16th organised by Loose TEA theatre.  And there’s quite a bit more of interest.  Continue reading

Tour dates for Bicycle Opera Project

Bicycle Opera Project have announced their 2017 tour dates.  They will be performing Juliet Palmer and Anna Chatterton’s Sweat.  It’s a work about sweatshop labour in the garment industry and is scored for nine voices and no instruments.  Sweat will be directed by Banuta Rubess, conducted by Geoffrey Sirett and designed by Sonja Rainey. The cast includes: Catherine Daniel, Caitlin Wood, Stephanie Tritchew, Keith Lam, Larissa Koniuk, Justine Owens, Emma Char, Alexandra Beley and Cindy Won.

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Dates and locations are as follows: Continue reading

dawn always begins in the bones

The Canadian Art Song Projects sesqui commission premiered today in the Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre.  It’s a piece by Ana Sokolović for soprano, mezzo, tenor, baritone and pianist and today, as was always intended, it got its first outing from members of the COC Ensemble Studio.  It was billed as a “song cycle” and, while it’s certainly a setting of poems to music, that description really doesn’t do it justice.  Sokolović’s music always seems to have dramatic potential and here that was realised extremely effectively by Anna Theodosakis to create a piece of performance art with many dimensions.

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Meanwhile, not more than two swallow’s flights away…

grail18When François Girard’s production of Wagner’s Parsifal opened at the Met in 2013 the COC was listed as a co-producer.  A year passed: winter changed into spring, spring changed into summer, summer changed back into winter, and winter gave spring and summer a miss and went straight on into autumn… until one day… at a Wagner Society meeting COC boss Alexander Neef came up with something more definite.  One day was last night.  The plan, apparently, is to stage the piece in 2021, hors saison.  It will form an epilogue to the 2020/21 (presumably in late May) season or a prologue to the 2021/22 season (late September).  This would appear to have two advantages; firstly it means that the technical problems of running a show where the stage is flooded with thousands of gallons of blood in tandem with another production are avoided and it means that if financing falls through the regular seasons are safe.  Naturally there is still the issue of the seven digit number so expect four years of rather intensive fund raising.  Anyone fancying sponsoring a flower maiden should contact Mr. Neef.

 

The rest of May

Ana_Sokolovic_2May continues to be a busy month.  There are a couple of interesting concerts at noon in the RBA next week.  On Wednesday 17th there is the unveiling of the annual Canadian Art Song project commission.  This year it’s extremely ambitious.  It’s a cycle of sixteen songs by Ana Sokolović setting texts drawn from right across Canada.  It’s called dawn always begins in the bones and will be performed by Danika Lorèn, Emily D’Angelo, Bruno Roy and Aaron Sheppard with Liz Upchurch at the piano.  (You can also hear this work in the Temerty Theatre at the Conservatory at 7.30pm on Thursday May 25th along with Andrew Staniland’s Peter Quince at the Clavier and Lloyd Burritt’s Moth Poem).  On Thursday 18th tenor Charles Sy and pianist Hyejin Kwon bid farewell to the COC Ensemble Studio with a performance of Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin.  It should be a real treat.

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Natalya Gennadi and Oksana G

ng2A couple of days ago I sat down to chat with Natalya Gennadi who will sing the title role in Tapestry’s upcoming premiere of Oksana G by Aaron Gervais and Colleen Murphy.  It’s a story about a Ukrainian girl who gets caught up with a sex-trafficking ring; an all too real phenomenon in Eastern and Central Europe as the Soviet system disintegrated.  For Natalya it’s a very personal piece.  She is Ukrainian and much the same age as Oksana would be.  It’s her era and Oksana is, she feels, a similar sort of person from a similar background and there but for…

Thankfully, Natalya’ “career path” has been rather different.  She didn’t set out to be a singer.  In fact she trained in linguistics before applying to, and being accepted by the Moscow Conservatory though she never studied there.  Instead she moved to Ottawa with her husband where she began to study music formsally.  With a degree from the University of Ottawa she came to Toronto to study for her masters.  Along the way she appeared in a number of student productions and since graduating has been keeping busy with roles mainly with opera companies and orchestras in the Toronto suburbs(*); most recently in the title role of Suor Angelica with Cathedral Bluffs and the countess in Le nozze di Figaro with the Brott Festival.  The latter representing something of a vocal shift from Puccini and the like to lighter rep.  This is something that she sees as an important (if slightly unusual) career direction.  There have also been competitions and the Karina Gauvin scholarship and a “career blueprint” award from the IRCPA.

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