Susannah in St. Petersburg

It’s an odd quirk of opera broadcasting that relatively few video recordings of operas get made in North America and those that do are almost all recorded at the Met.  This means that works that are standard rep on the west side of the pond but rarer in Europe may be very slow to get a video release, if they get one at all.  Now Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah is just such a work.  It’s the second most performed US opera after Porgy and Bess but has only just appeared on video for the first time.

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Lady of the Lake

LOL_coverThis is an interesting CD.  It couples the rather rarely performed Schubert cycle to texts by Sir Walter Scott with a new Fiona Ryan cycle on the same theme.  The reason the Schubert is a bit of a rarity is that, besides high and low voice and piano, one number requires a female chorus and another a TTBB quartet.  In fact here those two pieces were recorded separately in different locations but I don’t think it’s apparent listening to the disc.  The Schubert also includes the well known Ave Maria, the sixth song in the cycle, given here in the German originally used by Schubert rather than the Latin version usually heard.  It’s a very decent performance.  Maureen Batt is the soprano (and the evil genius behind the whole enterprise).  Her voice is light and clear and her diction is excellent.  Even a piece like the Ave Maria sounds fresh.  Jon-Paul Décosse is the baritone.  It’s a firm, confident voice, again with every word clearly audible.  Simon Docking provides excellent accompaniment.  The Bootgesang is performed by Leander Mendoza and Justin Simard; tenors with Robert O’Quinn and James Levesque; baritones, again with Docking at the piano.  This might be the most fun piece of the cycle.  For the elegiac Coronach we get The Halifax Camerata Singers conducted by Jeff Joudrey with Lynette Wahlstrom at the piano.  They sound very pleasant.

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Signal boosting

charlotte-poster-dots-600I didn’t actually see anything much in the Luminato line up that got my juices flowing but my attention has now been drawn to CHARLOTTE: A Tri-Coloured Play with Music.  It’s a Singspiel about a young female Jewish artist struggling with her identity and art during the early 1940s.  She ends up in Auschwitz.  You get the picture.  The title role is being played by Adanya Dunn and the musical director is Peter Tiefenbach which, frankly, are reasons enough to go see it.  It plays June 16th to 18th at the Theatre Centre on Queen Street West.  More details here.

On a completely different tack, Jane Cooper is trying to raise funds to publish her biography of Bertha Crawford, a Canadian soprano who enjoyed a very successful operatic career in Poland and Russia in the early 20th century but who has been largely forgotten.  You can find out more at Jane’s Kickstarter page.

Red blooded Otello

I’m never quite sure what I think about large scale outdoor opera performances but the Macerata Opera festival’s 2016 production of Verdi’s Otello staged in the Arena Sferisterio comes over rather well on video.  It’s a complete contrast with the Salzburg production I reviewed a few days ago.  This is large scale “red in tooth and claw” Verdi.  There is none of the subtlety of the Salzburg performances but it is spectacular and quite exciting.

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Moscow Virtuosi

The Moscow Virtuosi Chamber Orchestra and their conductor, Vladimir Spivakov, played Roy Thomson Hall last night.  The first part of the concert was all instrumental and rather fine.  I was struck by the small band’s ability to vary the weight and richness of their sound to match the mood of the music.  Their treatment of Mozart’s Divertimento No.1, for example, was quite lean and sinewy.  On the other hand the string sound, especially the cellos, was much richer in a very moving and idiomatic account of the Shostakovich Chamber Symphony in C minor.  Things got even richer for Bruch’s Kol Nidrei where the orchestra was joined by 14 year old Israeli cellist Danielle Akta.  The orchestral sound was sumptuous here but the real star was Ms. Akta.  One expects virtuosity from the sort of young musician who tours with a major orchestra but one does not necessarily expect the kind of intensity that we got from Ms. Akta.  She played as if she had the sort of life experience one would simply not wish on a young girl.  Her instrument, an Orselli loaned by Dr. Moshe Kantor, was rather wonderful too.  She can do virtuoso too as she showed in the Popper Concert Polonaise that closed a very satisfying first half.

Spivakov_Danielle Akta_Jun8-2017_0066 - by Vladimir Kevorkov

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RCM 2017/18

The Royal Conservatory of Music announced their 2017/18 concert season last night.  There are over 100 concerts spread across just about every genre.  I think the following are likely of most interest to Operaramblings readers.

  • November 10th 8pm Koerner Hall – Barbara Hannigan with Reinbert de Leeuw in all Second Vienna School concert.  The pick of the season for me.
  • February 14th 8pm Koerner Hall – Ian Bostridge with Julian Drake in an all Schubert program.
  • April 22nd 3pm Koerner Hall – Gerald Finley with Julius Drake  with a mix of art song and British and American folksong.
  • April 6th 2018 8pm Koerner Hall – Bernstein@100; a celebration of Lenny with the ARC Ensemble, Sebastian Knauer and the lovely Wallis Giunta.

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Patchy Andrea Chénier

What’s become of David McVicar?  His 2015 production of Giodarno’s Andrea Chénier for the Royal Opera House seems typical of his recent work.  It looks expensive.  It features a starry cast.  He flirts with dramatic risk but in the last analysis it comes off as a bit tame and even sloppy.  Basically when the principals are at the centre of the drama it’s compelling stuff but when they are not it’s not and there are curious inconsistencies.

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