CCOC 2017/18

monkiestThe Canadian Children’s Opera Company have announced their 50th anniversary season.  The big news is that the main production will be a new piece by Alice Ping Yee Ho and Marjorie Chan (the team behind The Lesson of Da Ji).  The new piece is called The Monkiest King and is based on the legendary (and comic book) character the Monkey King.  Like the earlier work it will fuse western opera and traditional Chinese music techniques and instruments.  It will play at the Lyric Theatre at the Toronto Centre for the Arts May 25-27 2018.

There is also going to be a celebratory concert hosted by Ben Heppner on October 26 2017 at the Four Seasons Centre.  Besides performances by the current CCOC there will be appearances from Richard Margison, Krisztina Szabó, Simone Osborne and Andrew Haji and a choir of CCOC alumni.

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Baby Kintyre

kintyreAll families, they say, have secrets.  Few perhaps are as lurid as what came to light at 29 Kintyre Avenue, Toronto (about 2km from here) in the summer of 2007 when a contractor renovating the house discovered the mummified body of an infant wrapped in a 1925 newspaper.  Incredibly, the CBC was able to track down the last surviving member of the household from that era, a 92 year old woman living in a retirement home in up-state New York.  Her recollections, which formed the subject of a short two part radio documentary, provided a lot of context and background but few hard facts.  Who the baby was and how it came to be under the floorboards remains very much a mystery.

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One man and his guitars

macnaughtonA vocalist accompanying himself on the guitar (or one of it’s predecessors) is one of the oldest and most prevalent tropes in western music.  From Blondel to Billy Bragg it’s always been with us but it’s quite rare in the world of modern art music where the roles of singer and accompanist are trades as rigidly delineated as anything in a Clydeside shipyard.  Doug MacNaughton breaks the rules by playing a variety of kinds of guitar and singing in a range of styles.  For that question of style is vital too.  The mechanics of doing two jobs simultaneously affect singing style and centuries of performance history offer a bewildering range of stylistic choices.  It’s an issue I examined once before when reviewing a Bud Roach CD for Opera Canada.

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A quiet week

dougalNot so much on this week.  Tuesday COC chorus member and guitarist Doug MacNaughton, currently appearing as Antonio in Marriage of Figaro, has a noon hour concert on Tuesday in the RBA featuring a new piece by Dean Burry and other works ranging from John Rutter to Donald Swann.  Then on Friday CASP have an evening recital at the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse featuring Philip Addis and Emily Hamper.

Siegfried and Marriage of Figaro continue at the COC.  The last performance of the former is today at 2pm while the latter plays Wednesday and Friday at 7.30pm.

The Highwayman and Other Travels

Burry 2Most people in the Toronto opera world know Dean Burry principally as a composer of operas for children.  He’s written several and a couple have been mainstays of COC school tours.  It’s perhaps understandable then if his music is seen as approachable and maybe, even (sotto voce), a little unsophisticated.  Last night, a recital of Dean’s works in Victoria College Chapel; part of his DMA program at UoT, provided a chance to hear a number of works in a much broader range of styles.

The concert kicked off with Tussah Heera playing InPerfections for solo piano.  It’s a fully serial piece with the tone rows based on the DNA sequences of various hereditary diseases.  It’s quite striking and way more than a just a theory exercise.  The same could be said for Three Caprices for solo violin played by Dean’s partner Julia McFarlane.  These used a range of extended violin techniques to good effect.

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Week of 7th February

salThis week kicks off with a concert performance of a rarity; Salieri’s Falstaff.  It’s a concert performance by Voicebox:Opera in Concert.  Larry Beckwith conducts the Aradia Ensemble and a cast of Voicebox stalwarts.  You can catch it at 2.30pm today at the Jane Mallett Theatre.

There are two free events on Tuesday.  Chris Purves, Alberich in the COC’s Siegfried, has a lunchtime recital in the RBA with Liz Upchurch at the piano.  The programme includes Mussorgsky, Handel and Duparc.  At 8pm in the Victoria College chapel you can catch Dean Burry’s graduate recital as he finishes up his PhD.  Soon perhaps Canada’s most performed composer will no longer be a lowly TA.  Oh the joys of credentialism!

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Getting Messianic

AtG-Messiah-slideSo this week is the big Messiah week.  I’ll be seeing two; the TSO’s “big, fat” Messiah on Tuesday and Against the Grain’s choreographed version the following night.  The TSO version uses Andrew Davis’ “large scale” orchestration and has a great quartet of soloists.  It’s playing at Roy Thomson Hall Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday through Sunday.  The AtG version also has great soloists, it’s on a smaller scale and features Jenn Nicholls’ choreography.  It plays at Harbourfront Wednesday through Saturday.  There’s also Tafelmusik’s baroque take at Trinity St. Paul’s, also Wednesday through Saturday.

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