The week in prospect

russian-salonTomorrow (Sunday) afternoon Off Centre Music Salon opens its 2016/17 season at 3pm at Trinity St. Paul’s.  It’s an all Russian show called Four Seasons or Mother Russia.  It will feature songs by Prokofiev’s The Ugly Duckling and songs byTchaikovsky, and Rachmaninoff, as well as Arensky’s Piano Trio in D minor (op. 32).  The highlight is the Toronto premiere of Valery Gavrilin’s song cycle Seasons inspired by Northern Russian folklore and chanting traditions.  Performers include cellist Igor Gefter, pianists Inna Perkis and Boris Zarankin, violinist Mark Skazinetky and singers Joni Henson and Ryan Harper.

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CASP 2016

It’s been four years since the initial Canadian Art Song Project concert in the RBA.  Since then they’ve commissioned a number of works and started a recital series that has included innovative presentations such as the performance of Brian Harman’s Sewing the Earthworm given in November.  A work premiered that night; Erik Ross’ The Living Spectacle formed the conclusion to yesterday’s concert but first came a series of works performed by students from the University of Toronto.

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More spring fever

3b3790d131e56a6498103d0c82f97e9bThe very busy spring season continues for another couple or three weeks before we head into the summer lull.  This afternoon sees the final Songmasters concert of the season at the Royal Conservatory with the Hungarian-Finnish connection.  Soprano Leslie Ann Bradley, bass-baritone Stephen Hegedus, pianists Rachel Andrist and Robert Kortgaard and violinist Erika Raum will perform Kaija Saariaho’s Changing Light as well as works by Liszt, Bartók, Sibelius, and others.  That’s at 2pm in Mazzoleni Hall.

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Cloud Light

Cloud Light CMCCD 22315 Cover Canadian Art Song Project has just issued its second CD; Cloud Light.  It’s a collection of four contrasting works by Polish-Canadian composer Norbert Palej.  The first, Three Norwegian Songs (2011) was composed for baritone Peter McGillivray, who sings them here. The settings are of English translations of Norwegian texts.  Maybe it’s because the texts are translations or maybe because this seems the most American/Broadway inflected piece on the disk I found it the least effective but, as we shall see, it has serious competition.  In any event Peter sings it very well even when it goes cruelly high. Continue reading

A quiet week

dougalNot so much on this week.  Tuesday COC chorus member and guitarist Doug MacNaughton, currently appearing as Antonio in Marriage of Figaro, has a noon hour concert on Tuesday in the RBA featuring a new piece by Dean Burry and other works ranging from John Rutter to Donald Swann.  Then on Friday CASP have an evening recital at the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse featuring Philip Addis and Emily Hamper.

Siegfried and Marriage of Figaro continue at the COC.  The last performance of the former is today at 2pm while the latter plays Wednesday and Friday at 7.30pm.

A few announcements

MY Opera have announced the cast for their spring production of Britten’s The Rape of Lucretia.  Christina Campsall sings the title role with Nicholas Borg as Tarquinius.  Jonelle Sills, Daevyd Pepper, Jacob Feldman, Evan Korbut, Victoria Marshall and Anne-Marie MacIntoshround out the cast.  Natasha Fransblow will direct musically from the piano and stage production is by Anna Theodakis.  There will be three performances April 29th to May 1st in the Aki Studio at Daniels Spectrum.

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The Living Spectacle

spectacle-300x286The Canadian Art Song Project branched out last night with a ticketed concert at The Extension Room.  The opening number was the latest CASP commission; The Living Spectacle by Erik Ross to words by Baudelaire translated by Roy Campbell.  Like a lot of modern song the three movements were all quite piano forward and hard on the singer.  The second text, The Evil Monk, certainly brought out the darker and more dramatic side of Ambur Braid’s voice while the third, The Death of Artists, was cruelly high even for someone with Ambur’s coloratura chops.  She coped very well and Steven Philcox’ rendering of the piano part was suitably virtuosic.

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