dawn always begins in the bones

The Canadian Art Song Projects sesqui commission premiered today in the Richard Bradshaw Amphitheatre.  It’s a piece by Ana Sokolović for soprano, mezzo, tenor, baritone and pianist and today, as was always intended, it got its first outing from members of the COC Ensemble Studio.  It was billed as a “song cycle” and, while it’s certainly a setting of poems to music, that description really doesn’t do it justice.  Sokolović’s music always seems to have dramatic potential and here that was realised extremely effectively by Anna Theodosakis to create a piece of performance art with many dimensions.

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The rest of May

Ana_Sokolovic_2May continues to be a busy month.  There are a couple of interesting concerts at noon in the RBA next week.  On Wednesday 17th there is the unveiling of the annual Canadian Art Song project commission.  This year it’s extremely ambitious.  It’s a cycle of sixteen songs by Ana Sokolović setting texts drawn from right across Canada.  It’s called dawn always begins in the bones and will be performed by Danika Lorèn, Emily D’Angelo, Bruno Roy and Aaron Sheppard with Liz Upchurch at the piano.  (You can also hear this work in the Temerty Theatre at the Conservatory at 7.30pm on Thursday May 25th along with Andrew Staniland’s Peter Quince at the Clavier and Lloyd Burritt’s Moth Poem).  On Thursday 18th tenor Charles Sy and pianist Hyejin Kwon bid farewell to the COC Ensemble Studio with a performance of Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin.  It should be a real treat.

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Collaborations

Yesterday’s concert in the RBA was the annual collaboration between members of the COC Ensemble Studio and members of the Atelier Lyrique de l’Opéra de Montréal.  Danika Lorèn, Emily D’Angelo and Stéphane Mayer represented the COC with Baritone Geoffroy Salvas, tenor Keven Geddes, mezzo Caroline Gélinas and pianist Carol-Anne Fraser up for the visitors.  It was very much a program of “opera pops” but the quality of the performances was consistently more than decent and it made for a fun hour.

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Toronto Summer Music Festival 2017

The line up for this year’s Toronto Summer Music Festival, the first with Jonathan Crow as Artistic Director has been announced.  It’s the usual mix of orchestral, chamber, piano and small scale vocal music for the most part.  This being the sesquicentennial year it’s heavy on CanCon and, as in previous years, there are academy programs for both singers and instrumentalists.

Sesqui

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Quilico Awards

The Christina and Louis Quilico Awards are a singing competition for members of the COC’s Ensemble Studio.  This year’s edition took place early yesterday evening in the RBA.  Only five members of the Ensemble Studio were competing.  Megan Quick and Sam Pickett were not for reasons that I don’t think were announced and Aaron Sheppard was sick.  So it was a pretty brief affair.  The format as usual was that each contestant offered three arias and got to sing the one of their choice with the judges choosing which of the other two they should sing.
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Mélodies of the Heart

Yesterday’s concert in the RBA was dedicated to the late Stuart Hamilton, founding director of the COC’s Ensemble Studio.  Current members, mezzo Emily D’Angelo and baritone Bruno Roy, each gave us two sets of French songs accompanied respectively by Hyejin Kwon and Stéphane Mayer.  Ms. D’Angelo gave us Débussy’s Chansons de Bilitis and the curiously Débussy like Trois Mélodies by Messiaen.  Both sets are quite meditative and impressionistic and Ms. D’Angelo’s very beautiful voice suited them well.  There’s more there than beauty of tone.  She’s showing some interesting, very mezzoish, colours in the voice now and there’s clearly plenty of power in reserve as she showed on a couple of occasions.  It’s so easy to forget how young she is when a performance is this accomplished.  Ms. Kwon was a sympathetic accompanist.

And so to the boys who gave us Poulenc’s La fraîcheur et le feu and Ravel’s Don Quichotte à Dulcinée.  The Poulenc piece rather races along with the piano part, impressively played by Mayer, often much more interesting than the vocal line.  Roy was at his best in the more hectic passages where his diction and command of French were at a premium.  When the music became more expansive he didn’t quite seem able to expand with it; the voice lacking bloom in both upper and lower registers and with no real sense of some underlying power.  This was more of a handicap in the Don Quichotte songs.  Roy managed some decent physical and vocal acting, especially in the drinking song, but there just wasn’t enough heft to put in the swagger required in these pieces.

Prior to the  performances, the COC’s Janet Stubbs made a short speech in memory of Stuart which managed, in a very brief span, to convey both the impact he had on the Canadian and wider opera scene and a sense of his more endearing eccentricities.

Photos if and when.

The week in prospect

Tomorrow (Sunday) is a busy day.  There’s a matinée of Götterdämmerung at the COC with a few tickets still available.  UoT Opera is doing their annual student composer piece.  This year it’s called Prima Zombie and it’s based on the premise that a cabal of disgruntled music critics, disenchanted with the current state of opera, unearth and electrify the corpse of the celebrated 19th century diva Nellie Melba.  Mayhem ensues.  This one is in the MacMillan Theatre at 2.30 pm and it’s free.

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