Bandits in the Valley

Bandits in the Valley opened yesterday at Todmorden Mills.  It’s a site specific comic opera with words by Julie Tepperman and music by Benton Roark.  The time is 1880.  Sir George Taylor is the owner of the most productive paper mill in the British Empire but he wants more.  Specifically he wants to convert the entire Don Valley to paper thus depriving the pesky bandits thereof of cover.  He also wants Lily Pollard, the comely soprano lead of the travelling company he has engaged to stage The Pirates of Penzance as part of the mill’s 25th anniversary celebrations.  He’s not the only one after Lily.  She’s also the target of the female head of the troupe, Henri, and of Jeremiah, the bandit chief who is trying to obtain his inheritance.  He in turn is pursued by the house maid (and his cousin) Birgitta and, in a purely brotherly way of course, another bandit, Freddy.  In proper comic opera fashion a birthmark, naturally enough on Jeremiah’s buttock, is involved.  Mayhem ensues.

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Decades – the 1930s

The TSO’s Decades project has now reached the 1930s; very much home ground for me musically.  Last night’s program explored different aspects of the music making of the period, including serialism, in a varied show of why this is not “music to be scared of”.  It was also Sir Andrew Davis’ first appearance in his role of interim music director and supreme leader for life of the TSO.

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The week in prospect

Tomorrow (Sunday) is a busy day.  There’s a matinée of Götterdämmerung at the COC with a few tickets still available.  UoT Opera is doing their annual student composer piece.  This year it’s called Prima Zombie and it’s based on the premise that a cabal of disgruntled music critics, disenchanted with the current state of opera, unearth and electrify the corpse of the celebrated 19th century diva Nellie Melba.  Mayhem ensues.  This one is in the MacMillan Theatre at 2.30 pm and it’s free.

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Workshopping The Harvester again

stacie_3005bThis time last year I attended a workshop performance of a work in progress; Aaron Gervais’ The Harvester.  That time it was in piano score but semi staged.  Last night it was presented, at Gallery 345, in concert format but with chamber orchestra.  I’m not going to recap the plot etc because it’s all in last time’s review.  Let’s start by saying it’s coming along and I really look forward to seeing a fully staged version.

So, back to last night.  The concept is of a double bill of Schoenberg’s Erwartung in a chamber reduction followed by The Harvester so last night we started with half the Schoenberg (up to the discovery of her lover’s body).  The chamber reduction (by Aaron Gervais) for piano, three woodwinds, strings, horn and percussion works remarkably well.  The effect is similar (ironically) to Schoenberg’s chamber versions of Mahler’s songs.  Textures are clearer, if less lush, and the singer is less pushed for sheer volume which allows for a bit more subtlety.  It’s different but it works.  On this scale it’s a good fit for Stacie Dunlop; one of those singers who is an excellent musician and interpreter but is not a huge voice.

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Guidebook of Decadence

Coleman, Lemieux et Compagnie’s Against Nature presented last night at The Citadel, is another show combining vocal music and dance.  It combines two baritones; Geoff Sirett and Alexander Dobson with a dancer, Laurence Lemieux, playing a female servant.  Funny how things tend to coevolve in the arts world.  Combining vocal music with dance, once not so common, is now almost ubiquitous with productions from the likes of CASP, Against the Grain and FAWN among others.

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Fashion first at the COC

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Intellectual and Germanic

Observers of the Toronto opera scene will have noted the creeping influence of facial hair in the industry locally.  Perhaps it didn’t start with COC General Director Alexander Neef’s intellectually Germanic goatee but who could deny that it had a profound impact.  Earlier this week the four tenors of the Ensemble Studio appeared together sporting face rugs in varying stages of development and the scene is replete with other notable beardies.  Geoff Sirett, Robert Gleadow, Greg Finney and Alexander Dobson come to mind.  It’s almost compulsory, it seems, for baritones.   Continue reading

Workshopping The Harvester

HarvesterFAWN Chamber Creative’s latest project is an opera called The Harvester.  The libretto is adapted by Paul van Dyck from his own play of the same name and the music is by Aaron Gervais.  The genesis (and we’ll come back to that) of the piece lies in the mind of soprano Stacie Dunlop who wanted a reduced orchestration version of Schoenberg’s Erwartung and a one acter that could be performed with the same band to form a double bill with it.  Van Dyck’s play seemed to have the right stuff and Aaron was up for both parts of the project. Co-opting Kevin Mallon and his Aradia Ensemble and Amanda Smith to direct rounded out the project.

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