Baby Kintyre

kintyreAll families, they say, have secrets.  Few perhaps are as lurid as what came to light at 29 Kintyre Avenue, Toronto (about 2km from here) in the summer of 2007 when a contractor renovating the house discovered the mummified body of an infant wrapped in a 1925 newspaper.  Incredibly, the CBC was able to track down the last surviving member of the household from that era, a 92 year old woman living in a retirement home in up-state New York.  Her recollections, which formed the subject of a short two part radio documentary, provided a lot of context and background but few hard facts.  Who the baby was and how it came to be under the floorboards remains very much a mystery.

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Extensions of Us

There were crazy choices available to concert goers in Toronto last nigt but enough chose Extensions of Us at the Extension Room (where else) to fill the joint.  We were there to see a performance of piano, song and dance provided by the team of baritone turned tenor Adrian Kramer, soprano Lucia Cesaroni, dancers Jennifer Nichols (who also choreographed) and Justin De Bernardi with pianist and music director Maika’i Nash.  The complex motivations for the show and the full line up of music is contained in my interview with Adrian and Lucia here.

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Talking to Lucia Cesaroni and Adrian Kramer about Extensions of Us

cesaroni2kramerI spoke earlier today with Lucia Cesaroni and Adrian Kramer (via Skype to the west coast where Lucia is appearing with Pacific Opera Victoria) about their upcoming “recital” Extensions of Us; Melody and Movement at the Extension Room on November 13th.  It’s pretty much received wisdom that in Toronto the traditional art song recital is dying or maybe already dead.  Certainly audiences have declined and the format seems unable to draw the younger audience, even of opera goers.  I asked Lucia and Adrian about the motivation and inspiration for their show and also asked them to tell me a little more about what we are going to see and hear.

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Opera 5 do Hahn and Offenbach

Opera 5’s latest show presents two rarely seen French one act operas.  First up was Reynaldo Hahn’s  1897 work L’île du rêve.  It’s one of those French officer falls in love with beautiful sixteen year old girl on tropical island and then “duty” calls and he dumps her and she dies of a broken heart pieces.  The only twist is that here he offers to take her back to France but the ruling princess advises her that, away from the island, she will lose her charms and he’ll come to despise her so she doesn’t.  A touch of French worldliness colouring this rather overdone plot device perhaps?  The staging, by Aria Umezawa, is fairly simple though clearly a lot of thought went into how to make the intimate scenes between the principals work.  There are also some rather beautiful projections involved.

O5-Offenbach & Hahn-L'ile 1 Continue reading

And so it begins

teiyaSo, after the rather scattered events of the summer last night’s fundraiser for Opera 5 at Atelier Rosemarie Umetsu felt like the start of a new season.  It was well attended and organised in an intriguing and fun format.  Basically, Team Day and Team Night were competing to see who could raise the most money.  There were four rounds in which a singer from each team presented an aria, song or MT number.  The one with the most pledges got to sing his or her “show off” aria.  For an additional donation, the loser got to do the same.  Given that some of the city’s best young singers were performing it was to be expected that it was a good show.

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When the Sun Comes Out

tkIt’s World Pride Week in Toronto and as far as I know Tamar Iveri isn’t in town.  What is, is the Toronto premier of When the Sun Comes Out by Leslie Uyeda and Rachel Rose presented by Queer Innovative Theatre; a group of LGBTTIQQ2SA (WTF BBQ!) performers.  Unsurprisingly the piece treats of same sex relationships.  It’s a love triangle with a twist.  Solana (Teiya Kasahara) is a foot loose wandering lesbian who has fallen in love with a married woman, Lilah (Stephanie Yelovich) who, unfortunately, lives in a dystopia where same sex relationships are a capital offence.  Their relationship, and their lives, are threatened by Lilah’s jealous husband Javan (Keith Lam).  But he too has a secret in his past.  They also have a daughter who neither will give up making simple resolution of the relationship issues impossible.

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When the Sun Comes Out

kasaharaLeslie Uyeda’s opera, When the Sun Comes Out, which premiered at Vancouver’s Queer Arts Festival last year is coming to Toronto.  It will be given in concert performance at the Ernest Balmer Studio at the Distillery on June 26th and 27th.  Set in an imaginary country called Fundamentalia, a country where violation of gender roles is punishable by death, When the Sun Comes Out is the story of a love affair between two women, Lilah, a young, sheltered and wealthy married mother, and Solana, a gender outlaw and rebellious outsider just passing through as she’s passed through so many other countries in her restless, futile quest for happiness. In a land where love between women is punishable by death, Lilah and Solana fall in love but their affair is discovered by Lilah’s enraged and unpredictable husband, Javan.

Ensemble Studio graduate Teiya Kasahara, who premiered the role of Solana is joined by Hamilton based soprano Stephanie Yelovich, soprano, who will play the role of Lilah.  Keith Lam, baritone, will play the role of Javan. Opera 5’s Maika’i Nash will act as musical director and pianist. Continue reading