Not a review

This afternoon I saw Gerry Finley and Julius Drake in recital at Koerner Hall.  In other words, two supreme exponents of the art of lieder at the top of their game in a hall with near perfect acoustics.  They performed Beethoven and Schubert settings of Goethe texts, some Tchaikovsky and some Rachmaninoff, which gave Julius ample opportunity to show off.  They finished up with settings of folky things by Copland, Barber, Respighi and Britten.  The last was The Crocodile; a very silly and funny piece I hadn’t heard before.  The encore was by Healey Willans and Gerry gave a very nice plug for the Canadian Art Song Project.  Insert standard list of adjectival phrases describing top notch singing and accompaniment.  My humble scribing is not worthy.

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Not taken today.  My phone pictures were awful

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Voicebox 2018/19

mahagonnyVOICEBOX:Opera in Concert announced their 2018/19 season last night.  There are three main stage shows.  Two of them, alas, I can’t muster much enthusiasm for; Massenet’s Werther (November 25th 2018) and Schubert’s Fierabras (February 3rd 2019).  The first features Goethe’s version of Fotherington-Thomas and the latter is one of the most confused and implausible messes ever to “grace” an opera stage.  I’m much more up for the third show; Weill’s The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (March 30th/31st 2019). No details on casting or anything else but I assume the first two will be piano score and the last a chamber ensemble.  There are also two shows at Gallery 345; Little Mahagonny: a Tribute to Weill (September 25th 2018) and Viva Verdi (April 3rd 2019).

 

 

Whitney Mather in recital

I went to see Whitney Mather sing yesterday afternoon.  It was her second masters degree performance at Walter Hall with David Eliakis at the piano.  (Probably the first time I’ve heard David play a proper piano!)

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It was an interesting and well chosen program that allowed Whitney to demonstrate her musicianship and sensitivity to text.  For the most part it avoided overly obvious territory, starting with Purcell’s rarely heard The Blessed Virgin’s Expostulation which was followed by the obligatory CanCon.  In this case John Greer’s The Red Red Heart; settings of poems by Marianne Bindig.  The Purcell allowed some tasteful decoration and an opportunity to display appropriately baroque style.  The Greer, like so many modern songs, perhaps had more of interest in the piano line than for the voice but it did allow a brief coloratura flourish.

Next up were Respighi’s Quattro Rispetti Toscani to texts by Arturo Birga.  These are rather beautiful songs and should be heard more often.  Whitney brought out both the pathos and humour in the rather rustic (Tuscan dialect?) texts.

After the interval we were on more familiar ground with Schubert’s Der Hirt auf dem Felsen.  Tiago Delgado played the clarinet part quite beautifully and Whitney managed the crazy pace of the piece very well, managing to maintain a clear sense of shape and line.  She wrapped up with Milhaud’s Chansons de Ronsard.  These are a bit of a tour de force.  Some passages are really fast and much of the music lies high in the soprano range.  Whitney may not have the easiest, most beautiful, high notes ever but she does have all the notes and she hit them here with accuracy and without sense of strain.  She was particularly impressive in the crazy fast Tais-toi, babillarde.

All in all not a bad way to spend a late Saturday afternoon!

Russell Braun and Carolyn Maule at Mazzoleni Hall

8b440c574ff48428011373a5639b_GalleryYesterday’s Mazzoleni Songmasters concert featured Russell Braun and Caolyn Maule in a generous and varied program anchored on Schumann’s Dichterliebe; a setting of sixteen poems by Heine.  It was framed by three Mendelssohn songs and a varied and intriguing second half program.

Russell is a singer at the height of his powers.  He has a lovely instrument and perfect control of pitch, dynamics and tone colour.  He’s also a sensitive and musical human being.  Throw all that at text and music as rich as Dichterliebe and the result is inevitably quite wonderful.  One could just luxuriate in an emotional journey through the highs and lows of romantic love and a physical one up and down that magical river, the Rhine. The Mendelssohn was rather lovely too.

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Lady of the Lake

LOL_coverThis is an interesting CD.  It couples the rather rarely performed Schubert cycle to texts by Sir Walter Scott with a new Fiona Ryan cycle on the same theme.  The reason the Schubert is a bit of a rarity is that, besides high and low voice and piano, one number requires a female chorus and another a TTBB quartet.  In fact here those two pieces were recorded separately in different locations but I don’t think it’s apparent listening to the disc.  The Schubert also includes the well known Ave Maria, the sixth song in the cycle, given here in the German originally used by Schubert rather than the Latin version usually heard.  It’s a very decent performance.  Maureen Batt is the soprano (and the evil genius behind the whole enterprise).  Her voice is light and clear and her diction is excellent.  Even a piece like the Ave Maria sounds fresh.  Jon-Paul Décosse is the baritone.  It’s a firm, confident voice, again with every word clearly audible.  Simon Docking provides excellent accompaniment.  The Bootgesang is performed by Leander Mendoza and Justin Simard; tenors with Robert O’Quinn and James Levesque; baritones, again with Docking at the piano.  This might be the most fun piece of the cycle.  For the elegiac Coronach we get The Halifax Camerata Singers conducted by Jeff Joudrey with Lynette Wahlstrom at the piano.  They sound very pleasant.

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Schön

Today we said goodbye to Charles Sy and Hyejin Kwon as members of the Ensemble Studio.  They went out on a high note (indeed quite a few high notes….) with a very fine performance of Schubert’s epic cycle Die schöne Müllerin.  Charles was in fine voice for the whole 65 minutes or so.  He was delicate and floaty where he needed to be and fierce when warranted.  It was lovely and text sensitive and proof, if anyone still needed it, of what a fine singer he has become in the last couple of years.  Hyejin was equally accomplished.  The limpid delicacy of the intro to Wohin was just gorgeous but she also summoned up real power and volume when needed.  She was, as always, tremendous fun to watch.  We writers tend to focus on the singer and not give due weight to the pianist’s contribution.  Today we were reminded of how wrong that is.

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I hope both of them stick around the Toronto scene and I look forward to seeing them in future endeavours.  Thanks guys!

Photo credit: Tanner Davies

The rest of May

Ana_Sokolovic_2May continues to be a busy month.  There are a couple of interesting concerts at noon in the RBA next week.  On Wednesday 17th there is the unveiling of the annual Canadian Art Song project commission.  This year it’s extremely ambitious.  It’s a cycle of sixteen songs by Ana Sokolović setting texts drawn from right across Canada.  It’s called dawn always begins in the bones and will be performed by Danika Lorèn, Emily D’Angelo, Bruno Roy and Aaron Sheppard with Liz Upchurch at the piano.  (You can also hear this work in the Temerty Theatre at the Conservatory at 7.30pm on Thursday May 25th along with Andrew Staniland’s Peter Quince at the Clavier and Lloyd Burritt’s Moth Poem).  On Thursday 18th tenor Charles Sy and pianist Hyejin Kwon bid farewell to the COC Ensemble Studio with a performance of Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin.  It should be a real treat.

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