CASP at 21C

Last night’s Canadian Art Song Project, part of the Conservatory’s 21C festival, was sold out.  Yep, a sold out concert of contemporary Canadian art song not featuring an A-list singer.  Clearly Mercury is in retrograde or something.  Anyway, the first half of the concert featured baritone Iain MacNeil with one of my favourite collaborative pianists Mélisande Sinsoulier.  They gave us Lloyd Burritt’s The Moth Poem to texts by Robin Blaser.  This is a basically tonal work with a piano part that I found more interesting than the vocal writing (common enough in contemporary art song).  There was some nice delicate singing from Ian and complete mastery of the intricate piano part by Mélisande.  Andrew Staniland’s setting of Wallace Stevens’ Peter Quince at the Clavier followed.  This is a more ambitious work with quite a complex soundscape and a piano part that requires a range of technique as much of it is written to sound “mechanical” as a nod to the title of the poem.  Oddly, despite the title, the text is a rich but highly allusive rendering of the story of Susanna and the Elders and a reminder of how much a really interesting text can enhance a song.  I’d like to hear this again.

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Allison and Sinsoulier

The Thursday concert at UoT yesterday was a recital by Joel Allison and Mélisande Sinsoulier, respective winners of the Norcop song prize and Koldofsky prize in accompanying.  It was a very satisfying performance.  Loewe’s Tom der Reimer set the tone with fine singing from Allison and quite inspired pianism from Ms. Sinsoulier.  Allison displayed power and agility plus an ability to sing quite elegantly when required though perhaps he does occasionally “push” the drama a bit further than the text really needs.
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CASP 2016

It’s been four years since the initial Canadian Art Song Project concert in the RBA.  Since then they’ve commissioned a number of works and started a recital series that has included innovative presentations such as the performance of Brian Harman’s Sewing the Earthworm given in November.  A work premiered that night; Erik Ross’ The Living Spectacle formed the conclusion to yesterday’s concert but first came a series of works performed by students from the University of Toronto.

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