Berio Folk Songs

KLP171003-_D850281Yesterday’s lunchtime concert in the RBA featured members of the Esprit Orchestra and Krisztina Szabó.  Two instrumental pieces kicked things off.  There was an Andrew Staniland composition for snare drum and electronics; Orion Constellation Theory, played by Ryan Scott.  This was quite witty and inventive.  Very Staniland in fact.  Then came a three movement work for solo harp; Alexina Louie’s From the Eastern Gate played by Sanya Eng.  For two movements it was light and bright using mainly the upper end of the harp’s range.  It was engagingly tuneful too though not in any kind of conventionally tonal way.  The third movement was darker, louder and more dramatic, brooding even, and using a far wider range of the instrument’s capabilities.  All up, an interesting piece.

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Oksana G.

Aaron Gervais’ and Colleen Murphy’s Oksana G. finally made it to the stage last night after a most convoluted journey.  It’s being produced by Tapestry at the Imperial Oil Theatre with Tom Diamond directing.  The wait, I think has been worth it.  The story, set in 1997, of a naive country girl from the Ukraine who gets caught up in sex trafficking is dramatic and the it convincingly depicts the sleazy underworld of southern and eastern Europe created by the collapse of the USSR, the civil wars in the Balkans and the pervasive official corruption in countries like Ukraine, Greece and Italy.  It’s gritty and, at times, not at all easy to watch.

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CCOC 2017/18

monkiestThe Canadian Children’s Opera Company have announced their 50th anniversary season.  The big news is that the main production will be a new piece by Alice Ping Yee Ho and Marjorie Chan (the team behind The Lesson of Da Ji).  The new piece is called The Monkiest King and is based on the legendary (and comic book) character the Monkey King.  Like the earlier work it will fuse western opera and traditional Chinese music techniques and instruments.  It will play at the Lyric Theatre at the Toronto Centre for the Arts May 25-27 2018.

There is also going to be a celebratory concert hosted by Ben Heppner on October 26 2017 at the Four Seasons Centre.  Besides performances by the current CCOC there will be appearances from Richard Margison, Krisztina Szabó, Simone Osborne and Andrew Haji and a choir of CCOC alumni.

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Baby Kintyre

kintyreAll families, they say, have secrets.  Few perhaps are as lurid as what came to light at 29 Kintyre Avenue, Toronto (about 2km from here) in the summer of 2007 when a contractor renovating the house discovered the mummified body of an infant wrapped in a 1925 newspaper.  Incredibly, the CBC was able to track down the last surviving member of the household from that era, a 92 year old woman living in a retirement home in up-state New York.  Her recollections, which formed the subject of a short two part radio documentary, provided a lot of context and background but few hard facts.  Who the baby was and how it came to be under the floorboards remains very much a mystery.

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Tapestry Songbook VII

ksTapestry Songbook is the culmination of New Opera 101; a week long masterclass where young singers get to work with established performers on repertoire from Tapestry’s extensive collection of recent Canadian work.  This year the “masters” were Krisztina Szabó, Keith Klassen and Steven Philcox.  The week culminates with a series of concerts of :scenes”; some performed by the “masters” and some by the students.  As there were fourteen pieces performed and a cast of thousands I’m just going to report on my personal favourites with due apologies to anyone who got left out.

Klassen, Szabó and Philcox kicked things off with the rather disturbing Merk’s Dream; a collaboration from the 2011 LibLab by Nick Carpenter and Elisabeth Mehl Greene.  It’s a creepy vignette of a dying man trying to get through, and largely failing, to his developmentally challenged daughter, brilliantly portrayed by Szabó.  This was followed by  In This World George is Heartbroken; a 2012 LibLab piece by Hannah Moscovitch and Lembit Beecher about various, largely imagined, aspects of a dull middle class marriage.  By turns hilarious and violent it featured a really interesting prepared piano accompaniment and featured three of the stars of the evening; Gwenna Fairchild-Taylor, Janaka Welihinda and, new to me, the very impressive Markéta Ornova on piano.

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Next week and beyond

ileana-montalbetti-headshot-bohuang500pxThursday seems to be the big day next week.  Ileana Montalbetti and Rachel Andrist have a lunchtime recital in the RBA.  There’s Strauss and Mozart and Beethoven and more.  Ileana has been a really impressive Gutrune in Götterdämmerung so I’m excited to see her in recital.  That evening there’s a choice of the annual COC Ensemble Studio performance at the Four Seasons Centre where the Ensemble members will be offering staged scenes, with full orchestra, from Mozart’s La finta giardiniera, Bellini’s Norma and Handel’s Ariodante.  The alternative is Tapestry Songbook VII featuring Krisztina Szabó, Keith Klassen and Stephen Philcox performing numbers from Tapestry’s extensive back catalogue.  That’s at the Ernest Balmer Studio at 7.30pm.  There are repeat shows on Friday at 7.30pm and 10pm.  Looks like both 7.30pm shows are sold out but late night Friday is still available.  Operaramblings’ extensive spy network (not Louise Mensch) suggests that patrons may also learn something to their advantage.  The day before, Wednesday at 7.30pm, there’s a Don Giovanni in concert at Royal St. George’s Chapel. Actually seeing as how dancer Bill Coleman is involved it may not be entirely straight “in concert”.  The cast includes Alexander Dobson in the title role, Katherine Whyte, Colin Ainsworth, Taiya Kasahara, Vania Chan and Matthew Li plus a “special guest”.  Tickets at www.opera-is.com or on the door.  There is still time to catch the COC’s winter offerings.  The Magic Flute plays today, tomorrow and Friday with the last Götterdämmerung next Saturday.  That last seems to be sold out but the usual rush and standing room deals may apply.

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And now, the TSO

tso-music-director-peter-oundjian-photo-credit-sian-richardsHot on the heels of the RCM, the Toronto Symphony has announced its 2017/18 season, whih will be Peter Oundjian’s last as Music Director.  There’s lots of sesquicentennial stuff of course but here’s a summary of the interesting vocal stuff (rock and roll and other children’s music omitted).

September 27,28 and 30, 2017: Brahm’s German Requiem with Erin Wall and Russell Braun.

October 19 and 20, 2017: Mahler’s Das Lied von der Erde with Susan Platts and Michael Schade.  This is billed as a Maureen Forrester commemoration.

November 9 and 11, 2017: Jeffrey Ryan’s Afghanistan:Requiem for a Generation with Measha Brueggergosman, Alysson McHardy, Colin Ainsworth and Brett Polegato.

December 16, 19, 20, 22 and 23, 2017: Handel’s Messiah with Karina Gauvin, Kristina Szabó, Frédéric Antoun and Joshua Hopkins.

April 26 and 28, 2018: A concert performance of Bernstein’s Candide with Tracy Dahl, Judith Forst, Nicholas Phan and Richard Suart.

June 2 and 3, 2018: A concert called Water Music with Leslie Ann Bradley singing Dvorak, Schubert and Mozart.

June 28 and 29, 2018:  Peter Oundjian signs off with a Beethoven 9.  Soloists tba.

Full details here.