Diary and announcements

101574_DonGiovanni_Giovanni_Szenenfoto_02I guess it’s starting to quieten down a bit.  Next week there are a couple of things of interest.  On Monday the Faculty Artists at UoT have a concert in Walter Hall with Uri Mayer conducting.  It’s an all Mahler program with the Lieder eines fahrenden Gesellen and the Fourth Symphony.  The vocal soloists are Monica Whicher and Darryl Edwards.  Later in the week the UoT Opera has its main fall production.  This time it’s Don Giovanni conducted by Uri Mayer and directed by Marilyn Gronsdale.  That’s in the MacMillan Theatre at 7.30pm on Thursday, Friday and Saturday with a matinée on Sunday.  There will, as usual be two casts; one on Thurs/Sat and the other Fri/Sun.  On Friday there’s another Whose Opera is is Anyway? from LooseTEA Theatre; Toronto’s opera improv.  That’s at 7.30pm at the Comedy Bar.  They are moving from there (good!) to Bad Dog Theatre for their December show on the 20th which should also be hosting a monthly show in 2018.

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Opera for Disaster Relief

I have spent most of the last two decades working in healthcare.  Most of that has been at the high tech, big dollar end of the business and one thing one learns in that world is that the big dollars are big.  Sometimes one questions the large salaries of hospital administrators and ministry “off scale” bureaucrats.  Sometimes one asks whether spending very large sums to provide a marginal life extension of poor quality makes any sense.  Always one is aware that much of the money spent that way could have a much greater impact elsewhere.  Nobody would deny that a dollar spent on providing emergency medicine in a disaster area or conflict zone goes a lot further than a dollar spent on the latest experimental chemotherapy or dubious IT mega-project.  That’s why I, personally, support Médecins Sans Frontières and why I was so glad that to say thanks for their shiny new piano acquisition, Tapestry decided to stage a concert benefitting MSF and local “first responder” charity Global Medic.

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A crazy week

MusikfurdasEnde-v1It’s a bit of a crazy week coming up.  On Monday at 8pm there’s the first in a series of young artists concerts presented by Atelier Rosemarie Umetsu and Yamaha Canada.  This one features pianist Cindy Liu in an all Prokofiev program.  It’s at Rosemarie’s atelier at 310 Davenport Road and tickets are $20 ($10 student).

Tuesday is a double header with Erin Wall performing at noon in the RBA in a program of Korngold, Debussy and Duparc.  Then at 5.30pm at the Canadian Music Centre there’s a CD launch concert for Sing Me at Midnight; the latest recording from CASP featuring songs by John Greer.  Both these events are free.

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Announcements round up

The word Everything on a To-Do list on a dry erase board to remiWow!  There’s a stack of season and other announcements in my inbox.  Apologies for any redundancy from earlier posts but here’s stuff you might want to know.  In no particular order…

On November 6th at 7.30pm in the Conservatory’s Temerty Theatre Happenstance, made up of clarinettist Brad Cherwin, pianist Alice Hwang and singers Adam Harris and Whitney Mather, are giving a free concert.  Adam will be singing a set by Jean Francaix, promised to be “hysterical”, with bass clarinet, and Whitney will be singing Messiaen’s Resurrection with Alice and a duo for soprano and clarinet, Pascal Dusapin’s To God.  I would be all over this but I’m tied up that night.

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The rest of May

Ana_Sokolovic_2May continues to be a busy month.  There are a couple of interesting concerts at noon in the RBA next week.  On Wednesday 17th there is the unveiling of the annual Canadian Art Song project commission.  This year it’s extremely ambitious.  It’s a cycle of sixteen songs by Ana Sokolović setting texts drawn from right across Canada.  It’s called dawn always begins in the bones and will be performed by Danika Lorèn, Emily D’Angelo, Bruno Roy and Aaron Sheppard with Liz Upchurch at the piano.  (You can also hear this work in the Temerty Theatre at the Conservatory at 7.30pm on Thursday May 25th along with Andrew Staniland’s Peter Quince at the Clavier and Lloyd Burritt’s Moth Poem).  On Thursday 18th tenor Charles Sy and pianist Hyejin Kwon bid farewell to the COC Ensemble Studio with a performance of Schubert’s Die schöne Müllerin.  It should be a real treat.

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Natalya Gennadi and Oksana G

ng2A couple of days ago I sat down to chat with Natalya Gennadi who will sing the title role in Tapestry’s upcoming premiere of Oksana G by Aaron Gervais and Colleen Murphy.  It’s a story about a Ukrainian girl who gets caught up with a sex-trafficking ring; an all too real phenomenon in Eastern and Central Europe as the Soviet system disintegrated.  For Natalya it’s a very personal piece.  She is Ukrainian and much the same age as Oksana would be.  It’s her era and Oksana is, she feels, a similar sort of person from a similar background and there but for…

Thankfully, Natalya’ “career path” has been rather different.  She didn’t set out to be a singer.  In fact she trained in linguistics before applying to, and being accepted by the Moscow Conservatory though she never studied there.  Instead she moved to Ottawa with her husband where she began to study music formsally.  With a degree from the University of Ottawa she came to Toronto to study for her masters.  Along the way she appeared in a number of student productions and since graduating has been keeping busy with roles mainly with opera companies and orchestras in the Toronto suburbs(*); most recently in the title role of Suor Angelica with Cathedral Bluffs and the countess in Le nozze di Figaro with the Brott Festival.  The latter representing something of a vocal shift from Puccini and the like to lighter rep.  This is something that she sees as an important (if slightly unusual) career direction.  There have also been competitions and the Karina Gauvin scholarship and a “career blueprint” award from the IRCPA.

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