Farewell to Oundjian

Wouldn’t that make a really good title for a pipe tune?  But that aside Peter Oundjian is marking the end of his long run as Music Director of the TSO with a series of three Beethoven 9ths with Kirsten MacKinnon, Lauren Segal, Andrew Haji, Tyler Duncan and the Toronto Mendelssohn Choir joining the TSO.  I caught the second yesterday evening.  It’s always a bit odd listening to a piece one has been familiar with for years.  Will I hear or learn something new tonight?  Will this performance probe the nature of the piece like I have never heard it probed?  The Tafelmusik performance and recording of this piece did just that.  I felt I was hearing it for the very first time.  Alas, the only new thought I had last night was about how repetitive certain sections are.  So there it was, an OK run through but no more.  The soloists were fine, though perhaps possessing a weight of voice better suited to Tafelmusik at Koerner than the TSO in full cry in the unforgiving sonic deserts of Roy Thomson.  I did think Ms. MacKinnon and the sopranos of the choir managed the fiendishly high setting of their part (probably a good job that Beethoven didn’t have to listen to complaints from his sopranos) very well.  Nice work from the piccolo accompanying them too.  Otherwise it was a bit unremarkable though that didn’t stop the obligatory idolatry from the RTH audience.  Heaven knows what would happen if they ever heard a truly great performance…

MacKinnon, Segal, Haji, Duncan, Peter Oundjian (@Nick Wons)

Photo credit: Nick Wons

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What’s on in April

marcyApril is a busy month for fully staged opera.  Canadian Opera opens two productions and there are shows from Opera Atelier, Against the Grain and Essential Opera.  First up is the COC’s revival of Robert Lepage’s production of Stravinsky’s The Nightingale and Other Short Fables.  This opens on April 13th and runs to May 13th.  In 2009 it sold out so this time there are nine performances.  Also at the COC there’s Donizetti’s Anna Bolena completing the Tudor trilogy.  It opens on April 28th with nine performances closing May 26th.

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TSO 18/19

barbara-hannigan-2_photo©elmer-de-haas_preview_jpegThe TSO has announced its 2018/19 season; the first under the temporary (maybe!) direction of Sir Andrew Davis.  I think there’s a lot to like.  As ever it’s an eclectic mix of mainstream and contemporary orchestral music, major choral works, and more popular fare like film screenings with orchestra pops and Broadway but there are more guest conductors and, it seems to me, more focus on the core symphonic repertoire.

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Round up of 2017

It’s that time of year when one reflects on the good and the not so good.  What one would like to see more of and not.  What seemed significant about the year.  As I look back over my writings for the last twelve months one clear theme stands out, Reconciliation.  There was the COC’s very thoughtful and thought provoking remount of Somers’ Louis Riel in April and all the fascinating events that went on around that.  There were attempts by the TSO to incorporate Indigenous themes; the Tanya Tagaq concert in March and Adizokan with Red Sky in October.  Neither of these quite came off but the intent was good.  Then there was a really fine recital of works by Indigenous composers by Marion Newman at the beginning of the year.  Then, of course, the Clemence/Current piece Missing, about murdered and missing Indigenous women, which premiered in British Columbia and which I haven’t seen yet but really, really want to.  2017 was also the year when Land Acknowledgements went mainstream in the Toronto arts world.  I guess there’s some tokenism here but there does seem to be far more engagement with Reconciliation in the arts world than in, say, the political mainstream which is unfortunate because opera isn’t going to produce clean drinking water.  We have to start somewhere I guess.

a dance to the music of time

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Into December

reindeer-musical-28149293After the madness of November, December is much quieter.  Messiahs aside there are only a handful of events of note.  On Saturday at 7.30pm at Runnymede United Church the Cantores Celestes Women’s Choir have a concert of seasonal music which includes Kim André Arnesen’s Magnificat with Adanya Dunn as soloist.  On Tuesday 5th the noon recital in the RBA features Simone McIntosh and Stéphane Mayer.  The program hasn’t been published yet but I’m told it includes the Berg Seven Early Songs and a number of songs by Frank Bridge.  On Thursday evening at 9pm it’s Opera Pub Night at the Amsterdam Bicycle Club.  The theme is Messiah Pariah.  You have been warned.  The operatic event of the month is Against the Grain Theatre’s Bound.  This uses a mash-up of Handel’s music to explore issues related to the current worldwide refugee crisis.  It plays December 14th, 15th and 16th at the COC’s Jackman Studio.  As of now, it’s sold out except for the final 9pm performance on the 16th.  Toronto Consort have a Spanish themed Christmas show Navidad, featuring motets by Victoria and Guerrero plus villancicos and dances from Latin America.  This one is on December 8th and 9th at 8pm and 10th at 3.30pm.  Trinity St. Paul’s of course.  Also this weekend, more performances of Tapestry Briefs: Winter Shorts (see last post).

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Vaughan Williams at the TSO

I went to Roy Thomson Hall last night to hear an all Vaughan Williams program conducted by Peter Oundjian.  It’s not really my thing but there was a fine quartet of soloists lined up for the Serenade to Music.

EIS, Huhtanen, DAngelo, Wiliford, Duncan (@Jag Gundu-TSO)

Things got going with the Fantasia on “Greensleeves” which was perfectly OK if a bit hackneyed.  There was a decent account of the Concerto for Oboe and Strings with Sarah Jeffrey as the soloist.  Then there was the Serenade.  For some reason the soloists were lined up with the choir (the Elmer Iseler singers) behind the orchestra.  The result was sonic mush and textual porridge.  I caught exactly one word of the text; “stratagems” for what it’s worth.  The rest was not recognisable as English, let alone understandable.  And, of course, it was too dark to read the supplied text.  This despite soloists; Carla Huhtanen, Emily D’Angelo, Lawrence Wiliford and Tyler Duncan, who are consistently excellent with text. This is becoming very annoying.  As often as not when I go to see the TSO do vocal works the soloists are either inaudible or incomprehensible.  I know the hall is difficult but the performance of the Ryan Requiem last week showed that it is possible to showcase singers.  I think it’s really unfair to audiences and singers alike.  Anyway, I was so fed up that I left at the interval.

Photo credit: Jag Gundu

Winter draws on

Moving into winter what does the Toronto opera/concert calendar have to offer?  This coming week there’s an interesting looking concert in the RBA at noon on Tuesday.  The Haven Trio (soprano Lindsay Kesselman, clarinetist Kimberly Cole Luevano, and pianist Midori Koga) will perform the world premiere of Toronto-based composer Kieren MacMillan’s Three Portraits, a dramatic setting of poems by Dana Gioia, the current Poet Laureate of California.

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